A Little Bird Told Me

“If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, we have at least to consider the possibility that we have a small aquatic bird of the family anatidae on our hands.”

1,562 notes

Bird Fandom Roll Call

pepperandpals:

Do you have birds on the brain? Are you a parrot parent? A finch fanatic? A corvid connoisseur? Rabid over raptors? A sucker for songbirds? Wild about waterfowl? Hooked on hummingbirds? A budgie buff? Have a tendency for tiels and toos?

THEN REBLOG OR LIKE, FEATHER FRIEND.

Even if you just saw a bird once. Join us. Because birds.

(Source: pepperandpals, via magic-missile)

635 notes

allcreatures:


Wild ducklings eat out of a feeder on a high rise apartment roofdeck on the Upper East Side section of New York, USA. These duckings, 16 that were born a week ago, are enjoying the hospitality of a 12th-floor deck between Madison and Park avenues that has been home to wild ducklings for the last four years.

Picture: REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

Wild ducklings eat out of a feeder on a high rise apartment roofdeck on the Upper East Side section of New York, USA. These duckings, 16 that were born a week ago, are enjoying the hospitality of a 12th-floor deck between Madison and Park avenues that has been home to wild ducklings for the last four years.

Picture: REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

(via informatikaufgaben)

637 notes

fatchance:

Field Note: The ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) are back! Every time I’ve stepped outdoors today I’ve heard their high skirling mating cries, or spotted them flying high overhead, or both. They are most welcome. They can be a bit bossy to the local bald eagles (who overwinter), but the eagles were getting slack and complacent and can use some competition.
The photo is from my archives and previously unpublished. Please click for an enlarged view. 

fatchance:

Field Note: The ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) are back! Every time I’ve stepped outdoors today I’ve heard their high skirling mating cries, or spotted them flying high overhead, or both. They are most welcome. They can be a bit bossy to the local bald eagles (who overwinter), but the eagles were getting slack and complacent and can use some competition.

The photo is from my archives and previously unpublished. Please click for an enlarged view. 

(via aves-deus)